OSU applying to feds for permission to conduct industrial hemp research

OSU faculty submitted an application to the federal Drug Enforcement Administration seeking permission to conduct research on industrial hemp.

Survey: Oyster industry more sold on ocean acidification impacts than public

Many West Coast shellfish industry leaders are convinced ocean acidification is having consequences – a rate of belief more than four times higher than that of the public.

OSU's statewide programs meet more needs with legislature's support

OSU’s three statewide public service programs received a boost from the Oregon legislature with $14 million additional funds.

Organic gardens transform OSU landscapes, provide local food source

A new organic fruit and vegetable garden planted next to a residence hall at Oregon State University is part of a shifting philosophy by housing and dining landscapers

OSU researchers discover the unicorn - seaweed that tastes like bacon!

OSU researchers have patented a new strain of a succulent red marine algae called dulse that grows extraordinarily quickly

Tracking potato famine pathogen to its home may aid $6 billion global fight

OSU researchers have identified the Toluca Valley of central Mexico as the ancestral home of one of the world's most costly and deadly plant pathogens.

OSU scientists part of national APLU report outlining research challenges

Four OSU researchers played a key role in the creation and release of a report outlining six "grand challenges" facing the United States over the next decade.

Study finds only trace levels of radiation from Fukushima in albacore

Albacore tuna caught off the Oregon shore after the Fukushima Daiichi power station in Japan was destroyed in a 2011 earthquake had on slight traces of radioactivity, according to a newly published study.

Efforts to curb climate change require greater emphasis on livestock

The methane produced by ruminant animals, especially cattle, is a more important component of greenhouse gases and climate change than has been appreciated.

15,000 scientists in 184 countries warn about negative global environmental trends

Human well-being will be severely jeopardized by negative trends in some types of environmental harm, such as a changing climate, deforestation, loss of access to fresh water, species extinctions and human population growth, scientists warn in today’s issue of BioScience, an international journal.

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