Wildlife migration routes for multiple species can link conservation reserves at lower cost

Scientists have demonstrated a new technique for designing effective wildlife migration corridors while reducing the costs of conservation

    

Successful control of reproduction could help address concerns about use of engineered trees

Forestry scientists have found a way to arrest the development of flowers in poplar trees, paving the way for control of the unintentional spread of engineered or non-native tree species.

Conservation scientists call for global strategy to halt threatened animal extinctions

Aiming to stop the looming extinction of large wild-animal species across the globe, a group of international conservation scientists has issued a call for actions to halt further declines.

Small headwater streams export surprising amounts of carbon out of Pacific Northwest forest

Scientists have tracked a higher-than-expected amount of carbon flowing out of a Pacific Northwest forest from month to month through a small headwater stream, suggesting that forested watersheds may not store quite as much carbon as previously thought.

Studies confirm effect of wolves, elk on tree recovery in Yellowstone National Park

An analysis of 24 studies over a 15-year period has confirmed that wolves and their influence on elk represent a major reason for the recovery of trees that had previously been declining for decades in Yellowstone National Park.

Carbon stored in Pacific Northwest forests reflects timber harvest history

The amount of carbon stored in tree trunks, branches, leaves and other biomass — what scientists call “aboveground live carbon” — is determined more by timber harvesting than by any other environmental factor in the forests of the Pacific Northwest, according to a report published by researchers at Oregon State University.

Old-growth forests may provide buffer against rising temperatures

The soaring canopy and dense understory of an old-growth forest could provide a buffer for plants and animals in a warming world, according to a study from Oregon State University published today in Science Advances.

Ancient bones point to shifting grassland species as climate changes

More rainfall during the growing season may have led to one of the most significant changes in the Earth’s vegetation in the distant past, and similar climate changes could affect the distribution of plants in the future as well, a new study suggests.

Advanced wood products center receives economic development grant

The federal Economic Development Administration has approved a grant of nearly $450,000 to Oregon State University to jump-start the use of new engineered wood products in the building industry.

Fungal pigments provide commercial opportunity for paint and dye manufacturers

Oregon State University researchers have developed a new method for producing stable pigments from fungi, a process they say can be scaled up to match the needs of manufacturers of paints, wood finishes and textile dyes.

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