Novel research approach sheds light on how midsize predators interact

A novel research approach by Oregon State University has resulted in a key step toward better protecting the fisher, an important forest predator.

Country's largest estuary facing increasing acidification risk

Chesapeake Bay, the largest estuary in the United States and one of the largest in the world, is facing new risks from a layer of highly acidified water some 10 to 15 meters below the surface.

New assessment identifies global hotspots for water conflict

More than 1,400 new dams or water diversion projects are planned or already under construction, fueling the potential for increased water conflict between some countries.

OSU inks largest research grant in its history to begin ship construction

OSU has just received a grant of $121.88 million from the National Science Foundation to spearhead the construction of a new class of research vessels. 

Krill hotspot fuels incredible biodiversity in Antarctic region

A perfect combination of tides and wind is responsible for a hotspot of Antarctic krill along the western Antarctic Peninsula.

OSU researcher part of $14 million NSF program for improved genomic tools

Virginia Weis has been selected for a new program aimed at helping scientists better understand the relationship between gene function and the physical characteristics of organisms.

Northwest researchers map out regional approach to studying food, energy, water nexus

Natural resource researchers at OSU and two other universities are gearing up for a late-summer summit aimed at addressing food, energy and water challenges as interconnected, regional issues.

International science team: Marine reserves can help mitigate climate change

An international team of scientists has concluded that “highly protected” marine reserves can help mitigate the effects of climate change and suggests that these areas be expanded and better managed throughout the world.

"Narco-deforestation" study links loss of Central American tropical forests to cocaine

Central American forests are disappearing rapidly and much of the loss is being traced to the laundering of cocaine money.

Study provides detailed glimpse of predators' effects on complex, subtidal food web

Research using time-lapse photography in the Galapagos suggests the presence of a key multilevel “trophic cascade” involving top- and mid-level predators as well as urchins and algae.

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