Complex, old-growth forests may protect some bird species in a warming climate

Old forests that contain large trees and a diversity of tree sizes and species may offer refuge to some types of birds facing threats in a warming climate, scientists have found.

After a wildfire, attitudes about recovery vary with sense of place and beliefs about fire ecology

How people who live close to burned forests feel about landscape recovery — whether they sense overwhelming loss or see positive signs in the growth of new vegetation — depends largely on their attachment to the area and on their appreciation for the ecological role of fire.

OSU ember research: Smaller branches pack the fastest, biggest fire-spreading punch

As the West tallies the damages from the 2017 wildfire season, researchers at Oregon State University are trying to learn more about how embers form and about the blaze-starting potential they carry.

NASA looks for citizen scientists to collect snowpack depth measurements

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is looking for snowshoers, backcountry skiers and snow-machine users in the Pacific Northwest to gather data to use in computer modeling for snow-water equivalent, or SWE.

Forest harvesting rules effectively protect water quality in the Alsea watershed

Tree harvesting methods designed to protect streams from soil erosion and sedimentation can be effective in maintaining water quality, scientists have shown in a study in the Oregon Coast Range.

Floods are necessary for maintaining healthy river ecosystems

Flooding rivers can wreak havoc on homes and roads but are necessary for healthy ecosystems, research at Oregon State University suggests.

Condon Lecture at OSU to explore mysteries of the “deep Earth”

A Canadian researcher who has discovered a source of water more than 2 billion years old – and tasted it for the sake of science – will present the 2017 Thomas Condon Lecture at Oregon State University on Wednesday, Nov. 29.

15,000 scientists in 184 countries warn about negative global environmental trends

Human well-being will be severely jeopardized by negative trends in some types of environmental harm, such as a changing climate, deforestation, loss of access to fresh water, species extinctions and human population growth, scientists warn in today’s issue of BioScience, an international journal.

Corvallis Science Pub explores the mushrooms of Marys Peak

Fall rains bring out wild mushrooms in abundance, supporting a fast-growing industry, which exports products worth more than $6 million in Oregon.

Human activities are reshaping forest animal communities around the world

Forest-dwelling animals don’t have to live right by a road, pasture or human settlement to be affected by what scientists call forest edges. Indeed, animals up to a kilometer (0.6 miles) from an edge show a measurable impact from their proximity to areas where trees have been removed to make way for other land uses.