New grant will support OSU study of English learners with disabilities

Oregon State University has won a $400,000 grant to study how best to assist students who are English learners and also have disabilities.

Study: Future for charismatic pika not as daunting as once feared

A new study paints a complex future for the pika; researchers believe it  may survive, even thrive, in some areas, while facing extirpation in others.

No evidence that water birth poses harm to newborns, new OSU study finds

There is no evidence that water births, where a baby is intentionally born under water in a tub or pool, poses any increased harm to the child, Oregon State University researchers have found.

New chemical could yield therapy to prevent Type 1 diabetes

Oregon State University researchers have discovered a chemical that blocks Type 1 diabetes in laboratory mice and may work the same way in humans.

Exercise DVDs could be psychologically harmful for users

Using fitness DVDs to work out at home may seem like a good way to get started on new exercise goals this year, but those DVDs may also include negative imagery and demotivating language.

Injuries among Dungeness crab fishermen examined

Commercial Dungeness crab fishing on the West Coast is one of the highest risk occupations in the United States, but non-fatal injuries appear to go largely unreported.

Water deficits and rising temperatures increase stress on Pacific Northwest forests

Rising temperatures and late summer dryness are teaming up to push some types of Pacific Northwest forests beyond their ability to cope with stress.

OSU study: Packaging insecticides in tiny capsules may make them more toxic

Encasing insecticides in microscopic plastic capsules—a common formulation for many pest sprays on the market—may make them more toxic than the active ingredient alone, according to a new study from Oregon State University.

Climate can grind mountains faster than they can be rebuilt, study indicates

Researchers for the first time have attempted to measure all the material leaving and entering a mountain range over millions of years and discovered that glacial erosion can, under the right circumstances, wear down mountains faster than plate tectonics can build them.

Low-oxygen 'dead zones' in North Pacific linked to past ocean-warming events

A new study has found a link between abrupt ocean warming at the end of the last ice age and the sudden onset of low-oxygen, or hypoxic conditions that led to vast marine dead zones.