Anomalous ocean conditions in 2015 may bode poorly for juvenile Chinook salmon survival

Fisheries managers have been predicting a slightly below-average run of spring Chinook salmon on the Columbia River this year but a newly published suggests that it may be worse.

OSU to expand sediment core collection to one of largest in the world

One of the nation’s most important repositories of oceanic sediment cores, located at OSU, will more than double in size when the university assumes stewardship of a collection of sediment cores taken from the Southern Ocean around Antarctica.

Flame retardant chemicals may affect social behavior in young children

Some chemicals added to furniture, electronics and numerous other goods to prevent fires may have unintended developmental consequences for young children, according to a pilot study released today.

Fish and mercury: Detailed consumption advisories would better serve women across U.S.

Among women of childbearing age in the U.S., fish consumption has increased while blood mercury has decreased, suggesting improved health for women and their babies.

Altered lipids, skin infections may point to new personalized therapy for atopic dermatitis

Researchers have made a fundamental advance in dermatology that could lead to new therapies for millions of people with atopic dermatitis, one of the most common forms of eczema.

Maintaining an active sex life may lead to improved job satisfaction, engagement in work

Maintaining a healthy sex life at home boosts employees’ job satisfaction and engagement at the office, underscoring the value of a strong work-life balance.

Photos show promise as dietary assessment tool, but more training needed

Research at suggests that photos of your food are good for a lot more than just entertaining your friends on social media – they might help improve your health and also national nutrition policy.

More funding for long-term studies necessary for best science, environmental policy

Environmental scientists and policymakers value long-term research to an extent that far outstrips the amount of funding awarded for it, according to a study published today.

Often the villain, fructose may play hero's role in muscular dystrophy treatment

A substance widely known as a villain for its role in causing obesity-related health problems has emerged as a possible hero in the fight against a debilitating genetic disorder.

Reducing pressure on predators, prey simultaneously is best for species' recovery

Reducing human pressure on exploited predators and prey at the same time is the best way to help their populations recover, a new study indicates.