Bees love blue fluorescent light, and not just any wavelength will do

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Researchers at Oregon State University have learned that a specific wavelength range of blue fluorescent light set bees abuzz.

Research shows short gamma-ray bursts do follow binary neutron star mergers

Researchers at Oregon State University have confirmed that last fall’s union of two neutron stars did in fact cause a short gamma-ray burst.

Human encouragement might influence how dogs solve problems

Human encouragement might influence how dogs solve problems, according to a new Oregon State University study.

Fungi-produced pigment shows promise as semiconductor material

Researchers at Oregon State University are looking at a highly durable organic pigment, used by humans in artwork for hundreds of years, as a promising possibility as a semiconductor material.

Research shows dogs prefer to eat fat, and cats surprisingly tend toward carbs

Dogs gravitate toward high-fat food, but cats pounce on carbohydrates with even greater enthusiasm, according to research into the dietary habits of America’s two most popular pets.

Two from College of Engineering win prestigious CAREER awards from NSF

Two professors in the College of Engineering have received the prestigious Faculty Early Career Development award from the National Science Foundation.

Schizophrenics’ blood has more genetic material from microbes

The blood of schizophrenia patients features genetic material from more types of microorganisms than that of people without the debilitating mental illness.

Annotation tool provides step toward understanding links between disease, mutant RNA

Researchers at Oregon State University have developed a computer program that represents a key step toward better understanding the connections between mutant genetic material and disease.

Researchers take key step toward growing human organs in laboratory

Researchers have learned that precursor cells for skeletal muscles actually also give rise to neurons, blood vessels, blood cells and immune cells, pushing science one step closer to generating body parts in a laboratory.

Accumulating over time, even low concentrations of silver can foil wastewater treatment

Research has shed new light on how an increasingly common consumer product component – silver nanoparticles – can potentially interfere with the treatment of wastewater.

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