About the OSU College of Agricultural Sciences: Through its world-class research on agriculture and food systems, natural resource management, rural economic development and human health, the College provides solutions to Oregon’s most pressing challenges and contributes to a sustainable environment and a prosperous future for Oregonians.

Magnetic pulses alter salmon’s orientation, suggesting they navigate via magnetite in their tissue

Researchers in Oregon State University’s College of Agricultural Sciences have taken a step closer to solving one of nature’s most remarkable mysteries: How do salmon, when it’s time to spawn, find their way back from distant ocean locations to the stream where they hatched?

Decades-long butterfly study shows common species on the decline

The most extensive and systematic insect monitoring program ever undertaken in North America shows that butterfly abundance in Ohio declined yearly by 2%, resulting in an overall 33% drop for the 21 years of the program.

Bee health and sustainable beekeeping topic of Science Pub Corvallis

Ramesh Sagili, an associate professor of apiculture in Oregon State University’s College of Agricultural Sciences, will talk about the status of honey bee health and sustainable beekeeping, Monday, March 11, at Science Pub Corvallis. The presentation will start at 6 p.m. at the Old World Deli, 341 2ndSt. in Corvallis.

 

Trout, salamander populations able to quickly bounce back from severe drought conditions

Populations of coastal cutthroat trout and coastal giant salamanders in the Pacific Northwest show the ability to rebound quickly from drought conditions, new research by Oregon State University suggests.

Research finds quakes can systematically trigger other ones on opposite side of Earth

New research shows that a big earthquake can not only cause other quakes, but large ones, and on the opposite side of the Earth.

Diverse salmon populations enable ‘resource surfing’ bears to eat tons of fish

Research shows that Kodiak brown bears that sync their stream-to-stream movements to salmon spawning patterns eat longer and more than bears that don’t.

Extreme climate variability destabilizing West Coast ecosystems

An increase in the synchrony of the climate could expose marine and terrestrial organisms to higher risks of extinction.

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