About the OSU College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences (CEOAS): The college is renowned for research excellence and academic programs that span the earth, ocean and climate sciences, as well as the human dimensions of environmental change. CEOAS inspires scientific solutions for Oregon and the world.

Sea levels to continue rising after current Paris agreement emission pledges expire in 2030

Sea levels will continue to rise around the world long after current carbon emissions pledges made through the Paris climate agreement are met and global temperatures stabilize, a new study indicates.

Two million-year-old ice provides snapshot of Earth’s greenhouse gas history

Two million-year old ice from Antarctica recently uncovered by a team of researchers provides a clearer picture into the connections between greenhouse gases and climate in ancient times and will help scientists understand future climate change.

Large transnational corporations play critical role in global natural resource management

Researchers have identified six corporate actions that, combined with effective public policy and improved governmental regulations, could help large transnational corporations steer environmental stewardship efforts around the world, a new paper suggests.

New observations find Alaskan glacier melt rates significantly higher than predicted by theory

New acoustic observations mapping the changing face of the LeConte Glacier in southeast Alaska show that the rate of submarine melt is much higher than previously predicted by scientific theory.

Study may solve long-standing mystery of why atmospheric CO2 was lower during ice ages

A combination of sea water temperatures and iron from dust helps explain variations in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels during ice ages.

Scientists discover how climate modulates fertilization of North Pacific Ocean with Asian dust

The vast subtropical “gyres” – large systems of rotating currents in the middle of the oceans – cover 40 percent of the Earth’s surface and have long been considered biological deserts with stratified waters that contain very little nutrients to sustain life.

Conflicts and cooperation from the Columbia River to the Nile topic of Science Pub Corvallis

Hassan Latif, Egyptologist and a former curator at the Museum of Egyptian Antiquities in Cairo, and Aaron Wolf, a geography professor at Oregon State University, will discuss how the movement and availability of water change cultures and influence politics at the June 3 Science Pub Corvallis. The presentation begins at 6 p.m. at the Whiteside Theatre, 361 SW Madison Avenue.

Study: Deep-ocean creatures living a “feast-or-famine” existence because of energy fluxes

Scientists for the first time have tracked how much energy from plants and animals at the surface of the open ocean survives as particles drop to the seafloor more than two miles below, where they say a surprisingly robust ecosystem eagerly awaits.

National Science Foundation authorizes Oregon State to lead construction of third research vessel

Oregon State University has received an additional award of $108.12 million from the National Science Foundation to manage the construction of a third Regional Class Research Vessel to help bolster the nation’s aging academic research fleet.

‘NarcoLogic’ computer model shows unintended consequences of cocaine interdiction

Efforts to curtail the flow of cocaine into the United States from South America have made drug trafficking operations more widespread and harder to eradicate.

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