About the OSU College of Forestry: For a century, the College of Forestry has been a world class center of teaching, learning and research. It offers graduate and undergraduate degree programs in sustaining ecosystems, managing forests and manufacturing wood products; conducts basic and applied research on the nature and use of forests; and operates 14,000 acres of college forests.

A warmer future for the Pacific Northwest if carbon dioxide levels rise, climate projections show

In the midst of an unseasonably warm winter in the Pacific Northwest, a  comparison of four publicly available climate projections has shown broad agreement that the region will become considerably warmer in the next century if greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere rise to the highest levels projected in the the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) “business-as-usual” scenario.

For tropical forest birds, old neighborhoods matter

Old, complex tropical forests support a wider diversity of birds than second-growth forests and have irreplaceable value for conservation, according to an Oregon State University-led exhaustive analysis of bird diversity in the mountains of southern Costa Rica. 

Logging site slash removal may be boon for wild bees in managed forests

New research suggests the removal of timber harvest residue during harvesting may be a boon for wild bees, an important step toward better understanding the planet’s top group of pollinators.

Scientists warn of border wall’s impacts on biodiversity

A continuous wall on the border between the United States and Mexico would harm a multitude of animal species by fragmenting their geographic ranges, researchers have concluded

Researchers assess the health of forest pollinators and their link to agriculture

With a $1 million grant from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, scientists at Oregon State University are teaming up with state and federal agencies and the forest industry to study the health of native pollinators in managed forest landscapes and the contribution of these insects to crop productivity.

When it comes to the threat of extinction, size matters

Animals in the Goldilocks zone — neither too big, nor too small, but just the right size — face a lower risk of extinction than do those on both ends of the scale, according to an extensive global analysis.

Use of structural wood in commercial buildings reduces greenhouse gas emissions

Substituting wood for concrete and steel in the structural systems of commercial buildings reduces fossil fuel use and cuts emissions of greenhouse gases on average 60 percent, according to a recent analysis by Oregon State University researchers.

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