Rising fossil fuel energy costs spell trouble for global food security

In an analysis of food preservation and transportation trends published in this week’s issue of the journal BioScience, scientists warn that new sustainable technologies will be needed for humanity just to stay even in the arms race against the microorganisms that can rapidly spoil the outputs of the modern food system.

Scottish explorer David Livingstone's writings, drawings now available through online archive

Students, researchers and the public will have extraordinary access to the drawings, letters and field diaries of Scottish explorer David Livingstone through an expanded archive and new website.

Scientists release predatory flies to protect eastern hemlocks from insect attack

Scientists say that a West Coast fly no bigger than a grain of rice may hold the key to survival of a tree that is being devastated by an invasive insect

Light-intensity exercise could prove beneficial to older adults, new research shows

An easy walk, slow dancing, leisurely sports such as table tennis, household chores and other light-intensity exercise may be nearly as effective as moderate or vigorous exercise for older adults – if they get enough of that type of activity.

Arsenic and health to be focus of Corvallis Science Pub

Once touted as a conditioner for the skin, arsenic has a long history as a poison and as an ingredient in paint, pesticides and wood preservatives. On June 8, the Corvallis Science Pub will focus on the modern public health story of this toxic metal.

Girls receive conflicting career messages from media, new research shows

Teenage girls like and feel more similar to women in appearance-focused jobs such as models and actresses, though they find female CEOs and military pilots to be better role models.

Hazing remains a concern in college marching bands, new study shows

Nearly a third of college marching band members surveyed in a national study observed hazing in their programs but few of the students reported the activities, often because of fears of retribution or loss of social standing, according to researchers.

Ocean acidification discussion on tap at Corvallis Science Pub

At the May 11 Corvallis Science Pub, George Waldbusser will describe what scientists know about the biological effects of ocean acidification.

Global decline of large herbivores may lead to an "empty landscape," scientists say

The decline of the world’s large herbivores, especially in Africa and parts of Asia, is raising the specter of an “empty landscape” in some of the most diverse ecosystems on the planet, according to a newly published study.

Statins show promise as a prevention tool for adults 75 and older, OSU study shows

Statins could be a cost-effective tool for preventing heart attacks and other cardiovascular incidents in adults over age 75, but the benefits would need to be weighed against potential side effects, a new study has found.

Pages