Reflections on wilderness featured at Corvallis Science Pub

At the June 9 Corvallis Science Pub, Cristina Eisenberg, an Oregon State University conservation biologist, will discuss why intact wilderness areas matter more today than they did in 1964.

Businesses need to plan for, address impacts on biodiversity, new report indicates

Businesses large and small need to begin the difficult work of assessing and addressing their impact on biodiversity and ecosystem services in order to reduce risk to natural resources, OSU researchers found.

Study: Targeted funding can help address inequities in early child care programs

The quality of early child care and education programs is influenced both by funding and by the characteristics of the communities in which the programs operate.

Corvallis Science Pub focuses on the future of the oceans

Warming ocean temperatures, rising acidity and reduced biological productivity threaten the livelihoods of about 2 billion people who depend on marine ecosystems, according to a report by an international team of 29 scientists last fall.

"The Carnivore Way" could be key to large predator conservation

North America’s mountainous backbone, stretching from Mexico to Alaska, could serve as a model for balancing the needs of large predators and people, an Oregon State University biologist suggests in a new book.

Changes in processing, handling could reduce commercial fishing injuries, research shows

Handling frozen fish caused nearly half of all injuries aboard commercial freezer-trawlers and about a quarter of the injuries on freezer-longliner vessels operating off the coast of Alaska, new research from Oregon State University shows.

Mistrust, discrimination influence Latino health care satisfaction

Mistrust of the medical community and perceived discrimination by health care providers can affect young Latinos' satisfaction with their health care and could influence health outcomes, affect participation in health care programs and more, researchers say.

Science of skin to be presented at Corvallis Science Pub

Americans spend billions to beautify their outermost organ – to make it softer and younger, to erase wrinkles, conceal freckles, fake a tan, or flaunt a tattoo.

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Americans spend billions to beautify their outermost organ – to make it softer and younger, to erase wrinkles, conceal freckles, fake a tan, or flaunt a tattoo.

 

At the March 10 Corvallis Science Pub, Arup Indra of the Oregon State University College of Pharmacy will discuss what scientists know about skin development and what happens when things go awry. The Science Pub presentation, which is free and open to the public, begins at 6 p.m. in the Old World Deli located at 341 S.W. Second St. in Corvallis.

 

Indra and his wife, Gitali Indra, collaborate in studies of skin cell development. Their goal is to identify treatment options to help protect against diseases such as skin cancer and eczema. More cases of skin cancer are diagnosed in the United States every year than of breast, prostate, lung and colon cancer combined.

 

And while skin cancer rates vary geographically, the nation’s highest are in the Pacific Northwest.

 

Sponsors of Science Pub include Terra magazine at OSU, the Downtown Corvallis Association and the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry.

 

Corvallis, Albany teachers link Costa Rica with Oregon schools

Three elementary school teachers – two from Corvallis and one from Albany – are conducting fieldwork with Oregon State University scientists at the Las Cruces Biological Station in Costa Rica this month.

"Pan-Pacific Test Site" to aid growth of unmanned aerial systems

OSU and the state of Oregon will participate in testing of new systems for unmanned aerial systems, the FAA has announced as part of a national initiative.

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