March - 2019

March - 2019
OSU sign Oregon State names three distinguished professors

Oregon State University has named Clare Reimers, Mas Subramanian and Virginia Weis as its 2019 Distinguished Professor recipients, the highest academic honor the university can bestow on a faculty member.

Scientists use honey from beekeepers to trace heavy metal contamination

 Scientists from Canada and the United States are using honey from neighborhood beekeepers to test for the presence of heavy metal pollution.

Tim Stock (center), coordinator of the Oregon State University School IPM Program, conducts training at West Albany High School in 2017 OSU Extension training results in reduced pesticide use in schools

Survey results show that the vast majority of Oregon’s school districts have implemented key integrated pest management practices, including reduced pesticide use, through training provided by Oregon State University.

February - 2019

February - 2019
seacliff erosion More extreme coastal weather events in Oregon likely to increase bluff erosion, landslide activity

Unstable slopes on Oregon’s coastline could see a 30 percent jump in landslide movements if extreme storms become frequent enough to increase seacliff erosion by 10 percent, a new study by Oregon State University shows.

Water flea (Ceridaphnia dubia) Packaging insecticides in tiny capsules may make them more toxic

Encasing insecticides in microscopic plastic capsules – a common formulation for many pest sprays on the market – could lead to unintended consequences.

PNAS Study: Migrating blue whales rely on memory more than environmental cues to find prey

Blue whales reach their massive size by relying on their exceptional memories to find historically productive feeding sites rather than responding in real time to emerging prey patches, a new study concludes.

A stand of red alder trees in the Oregon Coast Range Nitrogen-fixing trees “eat” rocks, play pivotal role in forest health

By tapping nutrients from bedrock, red alder trees play a key role in healthy forest ecosystems.

live-fuel wildfire test OSU ramping up research to better predict wildfire behavior

On the heels of Oregon’s most expensive wildfire season ever in 2018, researchers at Oregon State University are ramping up efforts to better predict how the blazes behave, including how they generate fire-spreading embers.

Study finds reduction in seabird bycatch since 2002, but researchers urge vigilance as rates rising

A collaborative effort among the fishing industry, scientists and resource managers has led to a significant reduction in seabird bycatch in Alaskan longline fisheries since 2002, a new study documents, but researchers say that bycatch incidents are now increasing.

Women's Building Nearly two-thirds of American children live in asset poverty, new study shows

More than 63 percent of American children and 55 percent of Americans live in “asset” poverty, meaning they have few or no assets to rely on in the event of a financial shock such as a job loss, a medical crisis or the recent federal government shutdown.

How a flipping crab led researchers to discover that a commercially harvested species feeds at methane seeps

Researchers have documented a group of tanner crabs vigorously feeding at a methane seep on the seafloor off British Columbia – one of the first times a commercially harvested species has been seen using this energy source.

aerial view of Memorial Union building OSU alumnus Warren Washington to receive prestigious Tyler Prize for pioneering climate studies

Pioneering climate scientist Warren Washington, who received his bachelor and master’s degrees from Oregon State University, has been named co-recipient of the 2019 Tyler Prize for Environmental Achievement.

Study finds Oregon’s unique “resident” gray whales actually move around quite a bit

A new study found that Oregon's population of "resident" gray whales actually travels quite a bit, though they have strong preferences for certain locations.

Cretaceous mosquito Mosquitoes that carry malaria may have been doing so 100 million years ago

The anopheline mosquitoes that carry malaria were present 100 million years ago, new research shows, potentially shedding fresh light on the history of a disease that continues to kill more than 400,000 people annually.

Study finds experimental extreme draining of reservoir has unexpected ecological impacts

The experimental extreme draining of a reservoir in Oregon to aid downstream migration of juvenile chinook salmon is showing benefits but also a mix of unintended consequences, including changing the aquatic food web and releasing potential predators downstream.

View of conifer forest from the top of Mary’s Peak, the highest point on Oregon’s Coast Range Climate modeling shows significant shifts in 21st century Pacific Northwest coastal forest vegetation

A changing climate in the 21st century will significantly alter the coastal forests of the Pacific Northwest, according to modeling by Oregon State University researchers.

Varied thrush NW Forest Plan 25 years later: Wildfire losses up, bird populations down

Twenty-five years into a 100-year federal strategy to protect older forests in the Pacific Northwest, forest losses to wildfire are up and declines in bird populations have not been reversed, new research shows.

January - 2019

January - 2019
Graduate Research Showcase Research showcase highlights work of engineering graduate students

Want to learn more about the Oregon State University College of Engineering’s far-ranging research efforts, including asking questions of those conducting the research? The college’s sixth annual Graduate Research Showcase provides that opportunity.

Climate report: Warming taking its toll on Oregon

The changing climate is having a significant impact on Oregon, a new report concludes, with the state growing progressively warmer, experiencing more severe wildfires, and undergoing a shift of seasons resulting in less snowpack and lower summer stream flows.

An inland silverside fish three days after hatching from the egg Blend of warmer water, chemical exposure influence gene expression across generations in a coastal fish

Warmer water temperatures, combined with low-level exposure to chemicals, influence the expression of genes in the offspring of an abundant North American fish species.

Chinese giant salamander Direct killing by humans pushing Earth’s biggest fauna toward extinction

One hundred forty-three species of large animals are decreasing in number and 171 are under threat of extinction, according to new research that suggests humans’ meat consumption habits are primarily to blame.

Grotthus mechanism Proton transport ‘highway’ may pave way to better high-power batteries

Researchers have found that a chemical mechanism first described more than two centuries ago holds the potential to revolutionize energy storage for high-power applications like vehicles or electrical grids.

Coastal giant salamanders Trout, salamander populations able to quickly bounce back from severe drought conditions

Populations of coastal cutthroat trout and coastal giant salamanders in the Pacific Northwest show the ability to rebound quickly from drought conditions, new research by Oregon State University suggests.

mantle creep ‘Silent slip’ along fault line serves as prelude to big earthquakes, research suggests

Big earthquakes appear to follow a brief episode of “shallow mantle creep” and “seismic swarms,” suggests new research at Oregon State University that offers an explanation for the foreshocks observed prior to large temblors.

Bears Alaska’s ‘outdated’ management plan increases risks to large carnivores, ecosystems, scientists say

Alaskan wildlife management that prioritizes reducing bear and wolf populations so hunters can kill more moose, caribou and deer is both backward and lacks scientific monitoring, ecologists say.

Far-ranging fin whales find year-round residence in Gulf of California

Researchers from Mexico and the United States have concluded that a population of fin whales in the rich Gulf of California ecosystem may live there year-round – an unusual circumstance for a whale species known to migrate across ocean basins.

Pit bulls Sample of rescued dogs shows link between gut microbiome, aggressiveness

A groundbreaking study of more than two dozen rescued dogs, some aggressive and some not, showed a clear link between aggressive behavior and the microbes that live in the dogs’ guts.

Oranges Metabolic syndrome patients need more vitamin C to break cycle of antioxidant depletion

A higher intake of vitamin C is crucial for metabolic syndrome patients trying to halt a potentially deadly cycle of antioxidant disruption and health-related problems, an Oregon State University researcher says.

Sockeye salmon running up the Kenai River to spawn Slime proves valuable in developing method for counting salmon in Alaska

Scientists have published a novel method for counting Pacific salmon – analyzing DNA from the slime the fish leave behind in their spawning streams.

December - 2018

December - 2018
Reducing drinking could help with smoking cessation, research finds

If quitting smoking is one of your New Year’s resolutions, you might want to consider cutting back on your drinking, too.

Trees’ enemies help tropical forests maintain their biodiversity, study finds

Scientists have long struggled to explain how tropical forests can maintain their staggering diversity of trees without having a handful of species take over – or having many other species die out. The answer, researchers say, lies in the soil found near individual trees, where natural “enemies” of tree species reside. These enemies, including fungi and arthropods, attack and kill many of the seeds and seedlings near the host tree, preventing local recruitment of trees of that same species.

Tree rings Tree-ring analysis explains physiology behind drought intolerance brought on by fire suppression

Tree rings tell the story of what’s happening physiologically as fire suppression makes forests more dense and less tolerant of drought, pests and wildfires, new research shows.

Researchers to use artificial intelligence, “big data” to locate and predict crime at sea

Researchers using artificial intelligence and “big data” plan to develop new algorithms that they say will enable them to identify, locate – and eventually predict – crimes committed in the world’s oceans, from illegal fishing off the Patagonia shelf to drug smuggling in Central America to slave labor and human trafficking in the Indian Ocean.

Swiss needle cast symptoms Climate change anomaly intensifies Swiss needle cast in some Douglas-fir forests

The fungal disease reacts favorably to the wet, foggy environment on the west slope of the Oregon Coast Range.

aerial view of Memorial Union building Machine-learning research at OSU unlocking molecular cages’ energy-saving potential

Nanosized cages may play a big role in reducing energy consumption in science and industry, and machine-learning research at Oregon State University aims to accelerate the deployment of these remarkable molecules.

50 years ago, OSU grad introduced the computer mouse and the world hasn’t been the same since

Fifty years ago this week, a quiet engineer, who had graduated from Oregon State University, introduced the world to windows, hypertext, video conferencing, computer graphics and the computer mouse – the latter a wooden block on wheels – years before they advanced daily business and consumer processes. .

hazelnuts Hazelnuts improve older adults’ micronutrient levels

Older adults who added hazelnuts to their diet for a few months significantly improved their levels of two key micronutrients, new research at Oregon State University indicates.

November - 2018

November - 2018
Linus Pauling Science Center Three Oregon State University researchers earn rank of AAAS fellow

The American Association for the Advancement of Science has awarded the distinction of AAAS fellow to three researchers from Oregon State University: Michael Freitag, David Maddison and Mas Subramanian.

Study: Earth’s polar regions communicate via oceanic “postcards,” atmospheric “text messages”

Scientists have documented a two-part climatic connection between the North Atlantic Ocean and Antarctica, a fast atmospheric channel and a much slower oceanic one, that caused rapid changes in climate during the last ice age – and may again.

Amber fossil Mosquitoes, other blood-sucking flies have been spreading malaria for up to 100 million years

The microorganisms that cause malaria, leishmaniasis and a variety of other illnesses today can be traced back at least to the time of dinosaurs, a study of amber-preserved blood-sucking insects and ticks show.

insight OSU scientists assisted in planning for Mars InSight landing

OSU scientist Jeffrey Barnes and colleagues helped NASA scientists and engineers plan for the tricky landing of Mars InSight, and have been involved with the Mars 2020 mission as well.

New federal report: Northwest climate could see more years like 2015

A new federal report on the impacts of climate change release on Friday – that includes a chapter focusing on the Pacific Northwest – warns that more years like 2015 may lie ahead for the region and they may be even worse.

Frog Mucus from frogs’ sticky tongues may jump-start next generation of high-tech adhesives

The next generation of high-tech adhesives could take some design cues from the tongues of frogs, according to new research led by the Oregon State University College of Engineering.

Reef Corals and their microbiomes evolved together, new research shows

Corals and the microbes they host evolved together, new research by Oregon State University shows.

Zebrafish Discovery of a new gene could shed light on chemical exposure effects in humans

The discovery of a new gene in zebrafish could lead to a better understanding of how exposure to chemicals leads to disease in humans.

Women's Building Response to daily stressors could affect brain health in older adults

Taking typical daily annoyances such as a long wait at the doctor’s office or a traffic jam on the freeway in stride may help preserve brain health in older adults, while emotional reactions could contribute to declines in cognition.

PNW forest PNW forests will be less vulnerable to drought, fire than Rocky Mountain, Sierra forests

Forests in the Pacific Northwest will be less vulnerable to drought and fire over the next three decades than those in the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada, computer modeling by researchers in Oregon State University’s College of Forestry shows.

Pharmacy Building Researchers identify factors behind small-intestine inflammation in immunodeficiency patients

Oregon State University researchers have discovered two key factors behind the intestinal inflammation that plagues people suffering from a disorder that affects their immune system.

Blacktail Deer Creek Yellowstone streams recovering thanks to wolf reintroduction

In the first study of its kind, research by Oregon State University scientists shows that the return of large terrestrial carnivores can lead to improved stream structure and function.

wild type Neisseria gonorrhoeae Researchers closer to gonorrhea vaccine after exhaustive analysis of proteins

In a study of proteins historic in its scope, researchers have pushed closer both to a vaccine for gonorrhea and toward understanding why the bacteria that cause the disease are so good at fending off antimicrobial drugs.

Construction starts on research ship to be operated by Oregon State University

Construction of a new Oregon State University-bound research ship that will advance the science of coastal environments, and support research on topics such as ocean acidification, hypoxia, and sea level rise, officially began today in Louisiana.

Newport OSU analysis finds countries following through on ocean conservation promises

Nations and organizations have taken action on nearly all of their recent ocean conservation pledges and almost half of those promises have been fulfilled, research by Oregon State University shows.

sheep grazing under array Solar arrays could be used as resources for plant productivity, study shows

Oregon State University scientists have found a resource to increase agricultural production on dry, unirrigated farmland—solar panels.

October - 2018

October - 2018
Gilbert Hall OSU a leader in national effort to ensure science strives for tangible, positive effects on society

Oregon State University is helping to spearhead a $5.2 million National Science Foundation effort toward ensuring that research projects make tangible, positive impacts on society.

honeybee OSU helps establish roadmap for filling the gaps in forest pollinator research

Actively managed conifer forests may also provide important habitat for the pollinators that aid in the reproduction of food crops and other flowering plants around the globe.

aerial view of Memorial Union building Animal species becoming extinct in Haiti as deforestation nearly complete

Species of reptiles, amphibians and other vertebrates are becoming extinct in Haiti as deforestation has claimed more than 99 percent of the country’s original wooded areas.

Black cottonwood poplar trees are vulnerable to a pathogen known as Septoria that causes cankers to grow on the stem and branches Genetic behavior reveals cause of death in poplars essential to ecosystems, industry

Scientists studying the valuable, but vulnerable, black cottonwood poplar have identified the genetic mechanism responsible for the species’ inability to resist a pervasive and deadly disease.

Noted OSU conservation researcher to speak at Science Pub Nov. 12

William Ripple, a distinguished professor in the College of Forestry at Oregon State University who has drawn worldwide attention for his research on wolves and other predators, and for publishing a scientists’ warning to humanity, will speak at the Corvallis Science Pub on Monday, Nov. 12.

Red algae Sidebar: Floating glass, plastic reveal new red algal genera and species, possibly from tsunami

An Oregon State University researcher analyzing debris from the 2011 Japanese tsunami has discovered two new species of red algae – one that attaches to plastic debris, the other is found only on glass.

boat Algae from Japanese tsunami debris hasn’t taken a foothold, though many were “global invaders”

Researchers have identified 84 species of marine algae and cyanobacteria that arrived in the Northwest via debris from the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami and, to date, none have gained a foothold in U.S. coastal waters.

squat lobster Researchers discover deepest known underwater volcanic eruption

A team of researchers has documented a recent volcanic eruption on the Mariana back-arc in the western Pacific Ocean that is about 2.8 miles below the ocean surface, making it the deepest known eruption on Earth.

Orchardgrass infected by a non-toxic species of Rathayibacter OSU researchers propose CRISPR as influencer of low genetic diversity in deadly bacteria

Scientists at Oregon State University have shed light on the evolutionary history of a soil-borne bacteria that is so dangerous to grazing animals it is kept behind lock-and-key to prevent its spread.

Oregon State names interim vice president for research

Oregon State University President Ed Ray Wednesday named Irem Tumer as interim vice president for research.

For a small segment of fans, sports consumption can be compulsive and potentially harmful

For a small percentage of the most avid fans, sports consumption may also be compulsive and potentially harmful, much the way that compulsive shopping, tanning or use of social media can be to some people, new research from Oregon State University shows.

Alsea River, Oregon Economic analysis provides watershed moment for environmental groups

Economists have found that in the United States, watershed groups have had a positive impact on their local water quality. 

aerial view of Memorial Union building OSU advancing disease understanding, diagnosis through use of big data

Patients are now being more precisely diagnosed and treated thanks to an Oregon State University researcher’s work in translational data science.

Study leads to a question: Should the fishing industry insure itself against risk?

Oregon State University’s James Watson, an assistant professor who specializes in marine resource management, published a study this week in which he and others outlined the need for aquaculture producers in developing countries to use financial risk management tools to protect their investment.

Cities’ population, transportation patterns affect how flu epidemics play out

The more people a city has and the more organized its residents’ movement patterns, the longer its flu season is apt to last, new research at Oregon State University shows.

2018 one of worst low-oxygen years for ocean off Oregon, which now has a “hypoxia season”

Oregon State University recently received a four-year, $1.1 million grant from the NOAA Coastal Hypoxia Research Program to work with Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, crabbers and other fishermen to map and track the extent of the hypoxia, identify “hotspots” and potential refuge areas, and develop predictive models of when and where low oxygen will occur – and affect Dungeness crabs and fishes.

Researchers identify potential new anti-cancer target: A microbe that helps cancer spread

Oregon State University researchers studying cervical cancer have identified a bacterium that helps the disease spread, a discovery that could open up a new way of treating cervical and other cancers.

September - 2018

September - 2018
Manta ray Manta rays’ food-capturing mechanism may hold key to better filtration systems

Manta rays strain their tiny food from mouthfuls of seawater in a novel way that could hold the key to better filtration in a variety of commercial applications, new research by Oregon State University shows.

The Brazilian mangrove forest fringes the entirety of the Atlantic Coast at the mouth of the Amazon River Amazon mangrove forest stores twice as much carbon per acre as region’s famous rainforest

Scientists have determined for the first time that Amazon’s waterlogged coastal mangrove forests, which are being clear cut for cattle pastures and shrimp ponds, store significantly more carbon per acre than the region’s famous rainforest.

Seafood/fishing industry alerted scientists to acidification, hypoxia issues off Oregon

The first biannual report to the Oregon Legislature from the Ocean Acidification and Hypoxia Coordinating Council concludes that the state needs more monitoring, public awareness and policy direction regarding these emerging ocean conditions.

Community college and high school students to spend four days on OSU research vessel

Oregon high school and community college students and teachers will join Oregon State University scientists on the research vessel Oceanus this month to gain at-sea research experience as part of a project to enhance STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) skills.

Monkey Gut microbes’ role in mammals’ evolution starts to become clearer

An international collaboration led by Oregon State University scientists has made a key advance toward understanding which of the trillions of gut microbes may play important roles in how humans and other mammals evolve.

Study: Unmanned “drones” give scientists new insights into gray whale behavior

Scientists using drones have discovered new behaviors by gray whales off the West Coast, including headstands and swimming upside down.

Oregon State to host robotics and artificial intelligence symposium

Oregon State University will culminate the 15-month celebration of its 150th anniversary with a daylong symposium on how artificial intelligence and robotics may change society, jobs and the economy.

Oregon State University has another blockbuster year in research grants and contracts

Oregon State University announced Tuesday that it recorded its second-best year ever in competitive grants and contracts for research that benefits every corner of the state and provides students with opportunities for hands-on experience.

August - 2018

August - 2018
New imagery solves mystery of why Mount St. Helens is out of line with other volcanoes

Some of the clearest, most comprehensive images of the top several miles of the Earth’s crust have helped scientists solve the mystery of why Mount St. Helens is located outside the main line of the Cascade Arc of volcanoes.

alpha male wolf in Yellowstone National Park Aspen is making a comeback in and around Yellowstone National Park, because of predators

The reintroduction of wolves into Yellowstone National Park is tied to the recovery of aspen in areas around the park, according to a new study.

OSU to name new research ship Taani, which means “offshore”

The first new Regional Class Research Vessel being constructed with funds from the National Science Foundation to bolster the nation’s aging U.S. Academic Research Fleet now has a name: Taani.

OSU sign Could religious freedom provide a shield for corporations supporting undocumented immigrants?

The Religious Freedom Restoration Act could provide a shield for liberal businesses seeking to support undocumented immigrants, much the same way the law has allowed conservative companies to challenge enforcement of health care and anti-discrimination laws, a researcher from Oregon State University suggests in a new paper.

Adults play a key role in children’s participation in school recess, researchers suggest

When adults are participants in school recess – leading games, monitoring play and ensuring conflicts are mediated quickly – children are more likely to be engaged in recess activities, a new study has found.

Map shows the probability of drought-prone forest soils in Oregon New ‘droughty’ soils model for Pacific Northwest could aid forest health in changing climate

Scientists have developed a new approach to modeling potentially drought-prone soils in Pacific Northwest forests, which could aid natural resource managers to prepare forested landscapes for a changing climate.

Wild bee Logging site slash removal may be boon for wild bees in managed forests

New research suggests the removal of timber harvest residue during harvesting may be a boon for wild bees, an important step toward better understanding the planet’s top group of pollinators.

Ipe tree Logging permit fraud threatens timber species in Brazilian Amazon

Timber harvested illegally under fraudulent permits is undercutting conservation efforts in the Brazilian Amazon, new research by an international collaboration shows.

aerial view of Memorial Union building Scientists trace atmospheric rise in CO2 during deglaciation to deep Pacific Ocean

A new study provides some of the most compelling evidence for how carbon dioxide rose during the last deglaciation – a “flushing” of the deep Pacific Ocean caused by the acceleration of water circulation patterns that begin around Antarctica.

Coral Corals and algae go back further than previously thought, all the way to Jurassic Period

Algae and corals have been leaning on each other since dinosaurs roamed the earth, much longer than had been previously thought.

amber Those fragrances you enjoy? Dinosaurs liked them first

The compounds behind the perfumes and colognes you enjoy have been eliciting olfactory excitement since dinosaurs walked the Earth.

Poplar trees Groundbreaking poplar study shows trees can be genetically engineered not to spread

The largest field-based study of genetically modified forest trees ever conducted has demonstrated that genetic engineering can prevent new seedlings from establishing.

Earthquake-mangled track Research finds quakes can systematically trigger other ones on opposite side of Earth

New research shows that a big earthquake can not only cause other quakes, but large ones, and on the opposite side of the Earth.

July - 2018

July - 2018
Burned and unburned areas in the Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge Fire is not all bad news in healthy sagebrush steppe ecosystems

Fire is not all bad news in healthy sagebrush steppe ecosystems, according to an Oregon State University study.

Kissing up to the boss can increase employees’ bad behavior in the workplace, study shows

Kissing up to the boss at work may help boost employees’ careers but it also depletes the employees’ self-control resources, leaving them more susceptible to behaving badly in the workplace, a new study has found.

Calliarthron tuberculosum Size the main factor in predicting how calcifying organisms will respond to ocean acidification

New research suggests size is the main factor that predicts how calcifying organisms will respond to ocean acidification.

Alaskan brown bear Diverse salmon populations enable ‘resource surfing’ bears to eat tons of fish

Research shows that Kodiak brown bears that sync their stream-to-stream movements to salmon spawning patterns eat longer and more than bears that don’t.

OSU sign Deep learning cracks the code of messenger RNAs and protein-coding potential

Researchers at Oregon State University have used deep learning to decipher which ribonucleic acids have the potential to encode proteins.

melting ice Climate change is the focus of new oral history website from Oregon State University Libraries

A website focusing on climate change and featuring oral history interviews with a dozen leading figures from OSU is now online.

image of marijuana leaves Second study finds Oregon college students reporting more marijuana use following legalization

College students at two large public universities in Oregon are reporting more use of marijuana following the drug’s legalization, including among those who are underage, Oregon State University researchers have found.

Student Experience Center OSU researchers determine why pulsed sparks make for better ignition

Researchers have learned the mechanisms behind a means of improved ignition, helping to open the door to better performance in combustion systems ranging from car engines to jet propulsion.

aerial view of Memorial Union building Study: Reducing carbon emissions will limit sea level rise

A new study demonstrates a clear correlation between cumulative carbon emissions and future sea level rise over time – and the news isn’t good.

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