Honeybee lives shortened after exposure to two widely used pesticides

Honeybee researchers in OSU’s College of Agricultural Sciences found detrimental effects in honeybees exposed to Transform and Sivanto, which are both registered for use in the United States and were developed to be more compatible with bee health.

Plant detectives develop new way to trace global spread of major plant disease

A team led by Oregon State University scientists has developed a way to potentially thwart the spread of a disease-causing bacterium that harms more than 100 plant species worldwide, an advance that could save the nursery industry billions of dollars a year.

Agricultural Research Foundation announces changes

Arp named leader, Karow retires

Researchers identify successful biological control for destructive fruit fly

A parasitic wasp has shown tremendous potential attacking and controlling spotted wing drosophila – an invasive, destructive fruit fly that costs Oregon growers close to a billion dollars a year.

Christmas tree shopping season is beginning to look a lot like 2018

This year’s Christmas tree shopping season is beginning to look a lot like 2018, with a tight supply and similar prices, according to Oregon State University Extension’s Christmas tree specialist.

Oregon State University’s Global Hemp Innovation Center receives $1M for genetics research

Oregon State University’s Global Hemp Innovation Center has received a $1 million gift to explore hemp genomics, research that can grow understanding of how hemp may be used in health and nutrition products, textiles and construction materials.

Researchers determine pollen abundance and diversity in five major pollinator-dependent crops

A new study provides valuable insights into pollen abundance and diversity available to honeybee colonies employed in five major pollinator-dependent crops in Oregon and California.

New analysis reveals challenges for drought management in Oregon’s Willamette River Basin

In Oregon’s Willamette River Basin, managing water scarcity would be more effective if conservation measures were introduced in advance and upstream from the locations where droughts are likely to cause shortages, according to a new study.

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