Scientists trace atmospheric rise in CO2 during deglaciation to deep Pacific Ocean

A new study provides some of the most compelling evidence for how carbon dioxide rose during the last deglaciation – a “flushing” of the deep Pacific Ocean caused by the acceleration of water circulation patterns that begin around Antarctica.

Corals and algae go back further than previously thought, all the way to Jurassic Period

Algae and corals have been leaning on each other since dinosaurs roamed the earth, much longer than had been previously thought.

OSU faculty members chosen as lead authors for sixth IPCC report

Oregon State University scientists Alan Mix and David Wrathall have been appointed as lead authors to the newly formed Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Assessment Report.

Study: Reducing carbon emissions will limit sea level rise

A new study demonstrates a clear correlation between cumulative carbon emissions and future sea level rise over time – and the news isn’t good.

OSU is purchasing land north of Waldport to begin PacWave energy test site project

Oregon State University is purchasing a five-acre parcel along the central Oregon coast that will be the shore-based facility for converting wave energy captured from a test site to be located about seven miles offshore into utility-grid accessible power.

Scientists believe ‘lost carbon’ during last Ice Age was stored in ocean via physics and dust

During the last ice age, atmospheric carbon dioxide was about one-third lower than it is today and scientists are uncertain why the distribution of global carbon was different than today.

Scientists use hydrophone to listen in on methane seeps in ocean, hope next to estimate volume

A research team has successfully recorded the sound of methane bubbles from the seafloor off the Oregon coast using a hydrophone, opening the door to using acoustics to identify – and perhaps quantify – this important greenhouse gas in the ocean.

Lessons about a future warmer world using data from the past

Selected intervals in the past that were as warm or warmer than today can help us understand what the Earth may be like under future global warming.

Pages