Extreme draining of Oregon reservoir aids young salmon and eliminates invasive fish

Low-cost, extreme draining of Fall Creek Reservoir aided downstream migration of juvenile chinook salmon – and led to the gradual disappearance of two species of predatory invasive fish in the artificial lake.

Young frogs that were stressed as tadpoles move less on land, putting their survival at risk

New Oregon State University research shows that juvenile northern red-legged frogs that have experienced climate-related stress as tadpoles are less likely to move on land, putting their survival at risk.

New scat study provides clues to puzzling existence of Humboldt martens in Oregon Dunes

Researchers are chipping away at solving a biological mystery on the central Oregon coast: the existence of an isolated population of a small but fierce forest predator that makes its home in the Oregon Dunes National Recreation Area.

Responses to environmental tragedies often make matters worse, ethicists find

Without sound decision-making, responses to seeming environmental tragedies can often make matters worse, according to ethicists who analyzed a controversial goat removal program on an Australian island.

New research suggests living near protected areas can have positive impacts on human well-being

Living near a protected area can improve aspects of human well-being across the developing world, new research published today in Science Advances suggests.

Dynamics of human migration caused by global warming topic of Science Pub Corvallis

David Wrathall, an assistant professor in Oregon State University’s College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences, will talk about how climate change affects human migration Monday, April 8, at Science Pub Corvallis. 

Scientists argue for more comprehensive studies of Cascade volcanoes

In a perspective essay published this week in Nature Communications, scientists argue for more “synthesis” research looking at the big picture of volcanology to complement myriad research efforts looking at single volcanoes.

Climate change negatively affects waterbirds in the American West

New research shows that recent climate change is having profound effects on wetlands across the American West – affecting birds that use these wetlands for breeding, migration and wintering.

 

Scientists use honey from beekeepers to trace heavy metal contamination

 Scientists from Canada and the United States are using honey from neighborhood beekeepers to test for the presence of heavy metal pollution.

Packaging insecticides in tiny capsules may make them more toxic

Encasing insecticides in microscopic plastic capsules – a common formulation for many pest sprays on the market – could lead to unintended consequences.

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