New Study: Snowpack levels show dramatic decline in western states

A new study of long-term snow monitoring sites in the western United States found declines in snowpack at more than 90 percent of those sites – and one-third of the declines were deemed significant.

Public invited to attend Fire Summit in Portland March 2

Wildfire scientists, land managers and policy leaders from across the West will convene in Portland on March 1-2 to consider steps to reduce the impacts of catastrophic fire in Western states, and a limited number of seats are available to the public on March 2.

Loon Lake sediment cores offer a 1,500-year time capsule of watershed disturbance

Researchers have analyzed layers of sediment at the bottom of a lake in southwest Oregon to describe the history of watershed disturbances reaching back nearly 1,500 years. 

Oregon State University science paper generated global response, financial support

A paper published last December by an Oregon State University scientist became one of the mostly widely shared science papers since 2011, according to the science communications company Altmetric, and has inspired private contributions to support further research.

A warmer future for the Pacific Northwest if carbon dioxide levels rise, climate projections show

In the midst of an unseasonably warm winter in the Pacific Northwest, a  comparison of four publicly available climate projections has shown broad agreement that the region will become considerably warmer in the next century if greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere rise to the highest levels projected in the the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) “business-as-usual” scenario.

Newly-hatched salmon use geomagnetic field to learn which way is up

Researchers who confirmed in recent years that salmon use the Earth’s geomagnetic field to guide their long-distance migrations have found that the fish also use the field for a much simpler and smaller-scale migration: When the young emerge from gravel nests to reach surface waters.

For tropical forest birds, old neighborhoods matter

Old, complex tropical forests support a wider diversity of birds than second-growth forests and have irreplaceable value for conservation, according to an Oregon State University-led exhaustive analysis of bird diversity in the mountains of southern Costa Rica. 

A view from above and below: Hatchery chinook salmon are self-sorting in tanks

Hatchery-raised chinook salmon sort themselves into surface- and bottom-oriented groups in their rearing tanks. This behavior might be due in part to the fish’s genes, according to an OSU study.

Novel research approach sheds light on how midsize predators interact

A novel research approach by Oregon State University has resulted in a key step toward better protecting the fisher, an important forest predator.

OSU College of Forestry, Pacific Northwest Tribes team up on $5 million forest restoration project

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Faculty in the Oregon State University College of Forestry will team up with Pacific Northwest Tribal nations on a three-year forest restoration effort whose goal is to improve the resilience of the region’s woodlands to climate change through Traditional Ecological Knowledge.

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