Wristband samplers show similar chemical exposure across three continents

Oregon State University researchers deployed chemical-sampling wristbands to individuals on three continents and found that no two wristbands had identical chemical detections – but the same 14 chemicals were detected in more than 50 percent of the wristbands.

Despite transition period, maximal running shoes may still lead to increased risk of injury

A six-week transition period did not help wearers adjust to “maximal” running shoes, indicating that increased impact forces and loading rates caused by the shoe design do not change over time.

When it comes to positive youth development, it is possible to care too much

New research indicates there may be a point where youth can “care too much” and caring becomes detrimental to their well-being.

Visualization strategies may backfire on consumers pursuing health goals

Using visualization as motivation is a common technique for achieving goals, but consumers who are pursuing health goals such as eating healthy or losing weight should use caution when using perspective-based visualizations, a new study has found.

Liver, colon cancer cells thwarted by compounds derived from hops

The plant that adds flavor, color and bitterness to beer also produces a primary compound that thwarts cancer cells, and two important derivatives of the compound do as well, new research at Oregon State University shows.

OSU professor joins congressman for public forum on drug prices Thursday in Portland

A professor from the Oregon State University College of Pharmacy will join Rep. Earl Blumenauer for a public forum on prescription drug prices Thursday, March 21, in Portland.

OSU Extension training results in reduced pesticide use in schools

Survey results show that the vast majority of Oregon’s school districts have implemented key integrated pest management practices, including reduced pesticide use, through training provided by Oregon State University.

Nobel laureate to speak at conference hosted by OSU’s Linus Pauling Institute

A Nobel laureate whose discoveries have advanced treatments for heart disease and impotence will deliver a keynote public address at Oregon State University this summer, part of the Linus Pauling Institute’s biennial conference on vitamins, minerals and natural products and their effects on human health.

Nearly two-thirds of American children live in asset poverty, new study shows

More than 63 percent of American children and 55 percent of Americans live in “asset” poverty, meaning they have few or no assets to rely on in the event of a financial shock such as a job loss, a medical crisis or the recent federal government shutdown.

From roaming vet in the Swiss Alps to Ironman athlete

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